Description

More commonly known as the Red Fuji

This famous work, considered one of Hokusai's defining masterpieces, comes from the Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji series, along with The Great Wave Off Kanagawa and Rain Below the Mountain. Early one morning at the beginning of autumn, Mt. Fuji is said to begin to assume a striking red hue. It is as if nature is loudly trumpeting the arrival of a new day.
Streaky clouds fill the sky as daybreak draws near. The summit of Mt. Fuji is still dark, awaiting the arrival of dawn, while the body of the mountain is bathed in sunlight, signalling a fine day ahead. This bold and courageous work manages to hold the viewer spellbound using just a handful of colours. It is easy to see why it had such a profound impact on the impressionists in western Europe at the time.
* The techniques and methods used to produce this work have remained unchanged since the Edo period. The Edo Woodblock brand of traditional multi-colour woodblock prints has been recognized by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry as a Nationally Designated Traditional Craft Product and a Tokyo Traditional Craft Product.

Size: Print size H25cm × W38cm
Frame size:H37cm×W52cm×D3cm
Weight: 2.0Kg
Lead-time: 2 weeks
Takahashi Kobo
https://takahashi-kobo.com/english/

Founded during the Ansei period (1854-1860), Takahashi Kobo has been making woodblock prints for approximately 160 years, since the Edo period (1603-1867). Originally working as surishi (the people who colour the woodblocks and print the final image) on Edo woodblock prints, the Takahashi family began publishing prints after their fourth generation took over. "The work of woodblock printing is the root of Japanese printing. From temple school textbooks to ukiyo-e prints and wrapping paper, Japanese printing has always been supported by the technique of woodblock printing," says Yukiko Takahashi, the sixth generation of the Takahashi family.

During the Edo period, ukiyo-e prints served the purpose of informative magazines. For example, in the image of a beautiful woman, fashion trends of the time such as the design of the kimono and furniture, hairstyle, and hand fan, were all depicted in meticulous detail. The artistic value of ukiyo-e is such that it is now recognized globally.

Currently, Takahashi Kobo prints a wide variety of themes using woodblock, from traditional ukiyo-e to modern art. Furthermore, Takahashi produces merchandise sold at museum exhibitions and also holds lectures, demonstrations, and workshops by artisans at museums and schools. Such initiatives, which give new life to the culture of Edo woodblock prints by sharing and experiencing of the history and techniques associated them, have been highly popular and more and more offers have been coming from overseas recently, such as from Paris and London.

However, Takahashi says, "Ukiyo-e prints remain the base of woodblock prints. As we make use of this rich tradition and culture, I would like to use all five senses to capture current trends, embody them, and use them to produce works that suit contemporary lifestyles."


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02-06-115-0179 In Stock
Takahashi Kobo